Close
Close

Panadol Tablets

Close

Panadol Soluble

Close

Panadol Soluble Max

Close

Panadol Compact

Close

Panadol Extra

Close

Panadol Extra Soluble

Close

Panadol Actifast

Close

Panadol Actifast Compack

Close

Panadol Night

  • Product
  • Format
  • Age
  • Key Features
  • Ingredients
Close
Colourfree Baby Drops

Panadol Tablets

  • Tablets
  • 6+ years
  • Gentle on the Stomach
  • 500mg Paracetamol
Close
Colourfree Suspension

Panadol Soluble

  • Soluble Tablets
  • 6+ years
  • Gentle on the Stomach
  • 500mg Paracetamol
Close
Chewable Tablet

Panadol Soluble Max

  • Effervescent Granules
  • 12+ years
  • Gentle on the Stomach
  • 1000mg Paracetamol
Close
Suppositories

Panadol Compack

  • Tablets
  • 6+ years
  • Gentle on the Stomach
  • 500mg Paracetamol
Close
Colourfree Suspension 5-12 Years

Panadol Extra

  • Tablets
  • 12+ years
  • Fights Tough Pain
  • Paracetamol 500mg
  • Caffeine 65mg
Close
Elixir 5-12 Years

Panadol Extra Soluble

  • Soluble Tablets
  • 12+ years
  • Fights Tough Pain
  • Paracetamol 500mg
  • Caffeine 65mg
Close
Suppositories 5-12 Years

Panadol Actifast

  • Tablets
  • 12+ years
  • Fast Pain Relief
  • Paracetamol 500mg
Close
Soluble 7+ Years

Panadol Actifast Compack

  • Tablets
  • 12+ years
  • Fast Pain Relief
  • Paracetamol 500mg
Close
Soluble 7+ Years

Panadol Night

  • Tablets
  • 12+ years
  • Relieves night time pain
  • Paracetamol 500mg
  • Diphenhydramine Hydrochloride 25 mg
Two Women Having Fun Sledding In Woods
Two Women Having Fun Sledding In Woods

Period Pain

Menstrual pain

What is the menstrual cycle?

A woman’s menstrual cycle is a natural process that generally occurs once every month as the body prepares itself for a possible pregnancy. At the start of each cycle, the uterus begins to develop a soft lining of blood-rich tissue in preparation to receive an egg that will be released from the ovaries (this is called ovulation).

If fertilized, the egg would develop into a baby. If fertilization does not occur, then the blood-rich lining of the uterus is shed, because it is no longer needed. This is called a period, or menstruation.

Why menstrual pain occurs

During menstruation, it’s normal to experience some cramping pain in the lower abdomen, which may spread to the lower back and thighs. This is often referred to as period pain or 'dysmenorrhea'.

The pain occurs as a result of the womb contracting (or squeezing) to remove the lining that it no longer needs, causing the uterus to compress nearby blood vessels and briefly cut off the oxygen supply to the uterus. This causes the release of chemicals such as prostaglandins, which are known to be involved in period pain.

 

Woman Lying In Bed With Hot Water Bag And Holding It On Her Belly

Most women have some pain during periods. The pain is often mild but, in about 10%–15% women, the pain is severe enough to affect day-to-day activities such as school or work attendance.

No one really knows why some women are more prone to period pain than others. Some period pain is caused by underlying medical conditions like endometriosis or pelvic inflammatory disease. It is also thought that some women have a buildup of prostaglandins, causing more severe period pain.

Related Articles

Tips for managing menstrual pain

Here are a few tips to help ease period pain:

Read More

Headache warning signs - and when to call the doctor

The majority of people experience headaches during their lifetime. For the most part, headaches are short lived, only lasting a matter of minutes or hours.

Read More

Related Articles

Related Articles

Suggested Products

Suggested Products

Suggested Products