Close
Close

Panadol Tablets

Close

Panadol Soluble

Close

Panadol Soluble Max

Close

Panadol Compact

Close

Panadol Extra

Close

Panadol Extra Soluble

Close

Panadol Actifast

Close

Panadol Actifast Compack

Close

Panadol Night

  • Product
  • Format
  • Age
  • Key Features
  • Ingredients
Close
Colourfree Baby Drops

Panadol Tablets

  • Tablets
  • 6+ years
  • Gentle on the Stomach
  • 500mg Paracetamol
Close
Colourfree Suspension

Panadol Soluble

  • Soluble Tablets
  • 6+ years
  • Gentle on the Stomach
  • 500mg Paracetamol
Close
Chewable Tablet

Panadol Soluble Max

  • Effervescent Granules
  • 12+ years
  • Gentle on the Stomach
  • 1000mg Paracetamol
Close
Suppositories

Panadol Compack

  • Tablets
  • 6+ years
  • Gentle on the Stomach
  • 500mg Paracetamol
Close
Colourfree Suspension 5-12 Years

Panadol Extra

  • Tablets
  • 12+ years
  • Fights Tough Pain
  • Paracetamol 500mg
  • Caffeine 65mg
Close
Elixir 5-12 Years

Panadol Extra Soluble

  • Soluble Tablets
  • 12+ years
  • Fights Tough Pain
  • Paracetamol 500mg
  • Caffeine 65mg
Close
Suppositories 5-12 Years

Panadol Actifast

  • Tablets
  • 12+ years
  • Fast Pain Relief
  • Paracetamol 500mg
Close
Soluble 7+ Years

Panadol Actifast Compack

  • Tablets
  • 12+ years
  • Fast Pain Relief
  • Paracetamol 500mg
Close
Soluble 7+ Years

Panadol Night

  • Tablets
  • 12+ years
  • Relieves night time pain
  • Paracetamol 500mg
  • Diphenhydramine Hydrochloride 25 mg
Baby Chewing Moms Sweater While She Holds Him
Baby Chewing Moms Sweater While She Holds Him

Teething

Teething: Taking Care Of Your Baby's Teeth

Teething may begin in the first few months after birth, but most babies begin teething at about six months of age. In some babies, teething may begin later, even after 12 months of age. Dribbling at three months may be a result of teething, or due to your baby learning to put things in their mouth, which is part of normal development.

Pain management and what you can do to help

  • Rub your baby’s sore gums gently with your finger or soft toothbrush
  • Give your baby a teething ring – either a soft rubber one, or the plastic type that can be kept in the refrigerator (note: liquid-filled plastic rings should be avoided). 
  • If you think your baby is in pain (for example crying, agitated or will no settle), consider giving paracetamol or ibuprofen as directed for the child’s age

What not to do

  • Do not tie a teething ring or other objects around your child’s neck
  • Do not place anything frozen on your child’s gums
  • Avoid hard sharp-edged toys that could damage teeth and gums
  • Never cut the gums to help a tooth come through – this can lead to infection
  • Do not use teething powders
  • Never give your child aspirin, or place aspirin on the gums or teeth
  • Do not use alcohol to rub on the baby’s gums
  • Do not use homeopathic remedies as they may contain ingredients that are not safe for babies

Signs of teething

  • Rosy, flushed cheeks
  • Increased dribbling
  • Chewing on everything
  • Restlessness

Related Articles

Headache warning signs - and when to call the doctor

The majority of people experience headaches during their lifetime. For the most part, headaches are short lived, only lasting a matter of minutes or hours.

Read More

Which type of headache is causing you pain?

There are several different types of headache – for example, tension headache, migraine, and cluster headaches. Each different type of headache has its own characteristic symptoms. Headache pain can be described as dull and throbbing or sharp and localized, and can last anywhere from a few minutes to a few days.

Read More

Related Articles

Related Articles

Suggested Products

Suggested Products

Suggested Products